Top 5 European Countries With Most & Least EV Chargers - EV Motors

Top 5 European Countries With Most & Least EV Chargers

If you are interested in knowing the top 5 European countries with the most and the least EV charging stations in the world, check out this video.

Countries With the Least Number Of EV Charging Stations

So according to this video, Latvia stands at the number 5 spot in the list of the European countries with the least EV charging stations.

The number of such chargers in this country is just 420. If you think this is a small number, wait to see even the next ones on our list.

Moving forward, the country with the fourth least number of EV chargers in Europe is Estonia which has just 385 chargers. As a bonus, it’s great to know that the most sold electric vehicle in Estonia is the Mitsubishi i-MiEV.

Due to 207 EV chargers in the whole country, the third spot is taken by Lithuania. However, the government is working hard to increase this number by 11 folds by 2024 and by 15 folds by 2027.

EV Charging hub
images.hgmsites.net

For now, Malta is the European country with the second least number of EV chargers in Europe. This number is limited to just 98.

The video, however, highlights that the number of these EV chargers has jumped from 36 in 2013 to over 4000 in 2022.

The top spot in this list is taken by Cyprus which has just 57 electric vehicle chargers.

Countries With the Most Number Of EV Charging Stations

The video also provides data about the countries with the most EV charger in all of Europe.

The 5th place in this list is taken by Italy due to its 23,543 electric chargers.

Sweden has the next number on the list as the country has 25,197 EV chargers.

EV charging
esources.news.e.abb.com

As France is highly interested in adopting the EV platform, it makes sense that the country sits at the number 3 slot in the list of countries with the most EV chargers.

France has 37,128 EV chargers for its 512,178 electric vehicles. However, the number is surging fast.

Germany has a total of 59,410 electric chargers. The number of EVs in Germany is expected to have crossed the 700,000 mark recently.

The Netherlands has the most number of EV chargers in Europe, at least for now. The number of such chargers is around 90,284.

Out of all the new vehicles sold in the country during the first month of 2022, 23% of the vehicles were all-electric.

Fast EV Charging Stations Per 100 Km Of Road

The video makes use of the below graph to show the total number of fast chargers per 100 km of road.

Charging stations per 100 km Europe
transportenvironment.org
Fewest EV Charging Stations Per 100 Km of Road

Here is the list of countries with the fewest EV chargers per 100 km.

5. Poland;

4. Bulgaria;

3. Romania;

2. Estonia;

1. Greece.

Highest EV Charging Stations Per 100 Km of Road

5. Austria;

4. Sweden;

3. Germany;

2. The Netherlands;

1. The UK.

Why Is There Such A Difference Between EU Countries?

There are multiple reasons why some countries invest more in EV networks than others. Some of the reasons that reflect how much attention is given to this segment include:

  • Expendable budget for the network. As the electric vehicle segment is still fairly new, the technology is not that cheap. This is why countries with high GDPs usually have better EV charging infrastructure.
  • Similarly, the buying power of the residents also determines how many electric vehicles a country has. This determines the number of EVs on the road and thus the charging network.
  • The environmental concerns of a country and its government also play a key role in the EV charging network. Countries that understand that ICE vehicles are harmful to the planet are now switching over to this newer and better technology.

As the number of electric vehicles on the road in Europe grows, so will the number of charging stations available. This is mainly because the EU has already imposed restrictions on sales of ICE vehicles by 2035.

Yet, with the deadline of 2035 approaching, preparations for EV charging infrastructure are falling short of expectations. Therefore, this is still a largely untapped market waiting for a winner.

 

Sources:

https://alternative-fuels-observatory.ec.europa.eu/

https://www.transportenvironment.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/01%202020%20Draft%20TE%20Infrastructure%20Report%20Final.pdf

https://www.eafo.eu/sites/default/files/2021-03/EAFO%20Europe%20on%20the%20electrification%20path%20March%202021.pdf

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